Arts Visual Arts

Digital Experiences at the WCU Bardo Arts Center

WCU Vitural Exhibits

Curious Terrain: WNC From the Air, Installation View

The WCU Bardo Arts Center (BAC), along with the entire David Orr Belcher College of Fine and Performing Arts, want people to know this: though the lights are off and the doors are locked, the arts are never closed.

The WCU Fine Art Museum has transitioned the remainder of its spring exhibition talks and related programs into webinars available on its website. This includes an on-demand virtual talk with Alex S. McLean, the exhibiting aerial photographer and pilot for Curious Terrain: WNC From the Air, and a talk with James T. Costa, executive director of the Highlands Biological Station and WCU professor of Evolutionary Biology. Additional webinars are also available with artist Claire Van Vliet; John Littleton and Kate Vogel; and Carolyn Grosch, curator of collections and exhibitions at the WCU Fine Art Museum.

Also available digitally is a series of images and videos from Time and Again: Glass Works by Kit Paulson and SaraBeth Post. This exhibit, funded in part by the Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass, examines side-by-side the work of Post and Paulson, who are both Penland-based glass artists. “This is a really special showcase of two artists who treasure history, both true and fictional,” says Post, who also offers a webinar talk on the exhibit. “Kit’s work is linear, an outline in space but rich and full of energy. I see my work with more density, a weight that is physical and familial.”

Post acknowledges that being unable to view the works in real space removes elements that are important to the experience, such as the play of light on and through glass, but there are positives as well. “More people can share, view the works, learn the story and become curious about glass art and its many facets,” she says.

Follow Bardo Arts Center for online opportunities and to see important updates about when its spaces will reopen. All opportunities and updates will be listed at arts.wcu.edu/virtual.

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